wine list

white wines

  • HOUSE WHITE WINE

    Pale yellow, clean, dry & characteristic
  • Bottle£14.95
  • 1/2 Bottle (375ml)£8.50
  • Glass (175ml)£4.55
  • FRASCATI SUPERIORE

    Fresh, crisp dry with soft smoth fruit
  • Bottle£17.95
  • 1/2 bottle £9.70
  • ORVIETO SECCO CLASSICO

    Dry, fruity, good structure
  • Bottle£17.95
  • 1/2 bottle£9.70
  • PINOT GRIGIO VENETO

    £18.95 Dry, fruity, aromatic, elegant finish
  • SOAVE D.O.C.

    £18.95 Delicate, fruity, fresh and gentle aroma
  • CHARDONNAY

    £18.95 Fine, fruity, dry and elegant
  • GAVI D.O.C.

    £21.50 Light straw yellow, delicate dry fresh harmonious

red wines

  • HOUSE RED WINE

    Ruby red, dry flavour, well balanced taste
  • Bottle£14.95
  • 1/2 Bottle (375ml)£8.50
  • Glass (175ml)£4.55
  • VALPOLICELLA D.O.C

    Sweet cherry fruit on nose & the palate
  • Bottle£17.95
  • 1/2 bottle £9.70
  • CHIANTI D.O.C.

    Wild fruit, dry taste with pleasant tannins
  • Bottle£19.95
  • 1/2 bottle£10.50
  • MERLOT

    £19.95 Distinct fragrance of raspberry
  • CABERNET SAUVIGNON

    £20.95 Dry, smoth, velvety, good structure
  • DOLCETTO D'ALBA

    £22.95 Dolcetto grapes, ruby red, slightly almond
  • BARBERA D'ALBA

    £24.95 Intense delicate, dry well bodied
  • BAROLO D.O.C.G.

    £39.50 Dry, full bodied and robust though smoth
  • AMARONE CLASSICO

    £42.50 Dry and pleasant, pomegranate colour
  • BRUNELLO DI MONTALCINO

    £48.00 Full bouquet oak vanilla tones

rose wine

  • CERASUOLO D'ABRUZZO

    £18.95 Fruity, dry, smooth & well balanced

sparkling wine and champagne

  • PROSECCO

    Spumant wine, fresh, extra dry, straw yellow
  • Bottle£21.95
  • Flute £5.50
  • HOUSE CHAMPAGNE

    £29.95 Brut, light and fruity
  • MOET CHANDON

    £50.00 From Pinot Noir & Pinot Meunier

did you know?

about italian wines

Italy is home to some of the oldest wine-producing regions in the world, and Italian wines are known worldwide for their broad variety. Italy, closely followed by France, is the world’s largest wine producer by volume. Its contribution is about 45–50 million hl per year, and represents about ⅓ of global production. Italian wine is exported around the world and is also extremely popular in Italy: Italians rank fifth on the world wine consumption list by volume with 42 litres per capita consumption. Grapes are grown in almost every region of the country and there are more than one million vineyards under cultivation.

In 1963, the first official Italian system of classification of wines was launched. Since then, several modifications and additions to the legislation have been made (a major one in 1992), the last of which, in 2010, has established four basic categories, which are consistent with the last EU regulation in matter of wine (2008–09). The categories, from the bottom level to the top one, are:

  • Vini (Wines - informally called 'generic wines'): These are wines that can be produced anywhere in the territory of the EU; no indication of geographical origin, of the grape varieties used, or of the vintage is allowed on the label. (The label only reports the color of the wine.)
  • Vini Varietali (Varietal Wines): These are generic wines that are made either mostly (at least 85%) from one kind of authorized 'international' grapes (Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Merlot, Sauvignon blanc, Syrah) or entirely from two or more of them. The grape(s) and the vintage can be indicated on the label. (The prohibition to indicate the geographical origin is instead maintained. These wines can be produced anywhere in the territory of the EU.)
  • Vini IGP (Wines with Protected Geographical Indication): This category (also traditionally implemented in Italy as IGT - Typical Geographical Indication) is reserved to wines produced in a specific territory within Italy and following a series of specific and precise regulations on authorized varieties, viticultural and vinification practices, organoleptic and chemico-physical characteristics, labeling instructions, etc. Currently (2014) there exist 118 IGPs/IGTs.
  • Vini DOP (Wines with Protected Designation of Origin): This category includes two sub-categories, i.e. Vini DOC (Controlled Designation of Origin) and Vini DOCG (Controlled and Guaranteed Designation of Origin). DOC wines must have been IGP wines for at least 5 years. They generally come from smaller regions, within a certain IGP territory, that are particularly vocated for their climatic and geological characteristics and for the quality and originality of the local winemaking traditions. They also must follow stricter production regulations than IGP wines. A DOC wine can be promoted to DOCG if it has been a DOC for at least 10 years. In addition to fulfilling the requisites for DOC wines (since that's the category they come from), before commercialization DOCG wines must pass stricter analyses, including a tasting by a specifically appointed committee. DOCG wines have also demonstrated a superior commercial success. Currently (2014) there exist 332 DOCs and 73 DOCGs for a total of 405 DOPs.

A number of sub-categories also exist regulating the production of sparkling wines (e.g. Vino Spumante, Vino Spumante di Qualità, Vino Spumante di Qualità di Tipo Aromatico, Vino Frizzante).

Within the DOP category, 'Classico' is a wine produced in the historically oldest part of the protected territory. 'Superiore' is a wine with at least 0.5 more alc%/vol than its correspondent regular DOP wine and produced using a smaller allowed quantity of grapes per hectare, generally yielding a higher quality. 'Riserva' is a wine that has been aged for a minimum period of time, depending on the typology (red, white, Traditional-method sparkling, Charmat-method sparkling). Sometimes, 'Classico' or 'Superiore' are themselves part of the name of the DOP (e.g. Chianti Classico DOCG or Soave Superiore DOCG).

The Italian Ministry of Agriculture (MIPAAF) regularly publishes updates to the official classification.

It is important to remark that looser regulations do not necessarily correspond to lower quality. In fact, many IGP wines are actually top level products, mainly due to the special skills of their producers (e.g. so called "Super Tuscan" wines are generally IGP wines, but there are also several other IGP wines of superior quality).

Unlike France, Italy has never had an official classification of its best 'crus'. Private initiatives like the Comitato Grandi Cru d'Italia (Committee of the Grand Crus of Italy) and the Instituto del Vino Italiano di Qualità—Grandi marchi (Institute of Quality Italian Wine—Great Brands) each gather a selection of renowned top Italian wine producers, in an attempt to unofficially represent the Italian wine excellence.

Italy's twenty wine regions correspond to the twenty administrative regions. Understanding of Italian wine becomes clearer with an understanding of the differences between each region; their cuisines reflect their indigenous wines, and vice-versa. The 73 DOCG wines are located in 15 different regions but most of them are concentrated in Piedmont, Veneto and Tuscany. Among these are appellations appreciated and sought after by wine lovers around the world: Barolo, Barbaresco, and Brunello di Montalcino (colloquially known as the "Killer B's"). Other notable wines that in the latest years gain much attention in the international markets and among specialists are: Amarone della Valpolicella, Prosecco di Conegliano- Valdobbiadene, Taurasi from Campania, Franciacorta sparkling wines from Lombardy; evergreen wines are Chianti and Soave, while new wines from the Centre and South of Italy are quickly gaining recognition: Sagrantino, Primitivo, Nero D'Avola among others. The Friuli-Venezia Giulia is world famous for the quality of her white wines, like Pinot Grigio. Special sweet wines like Passitos and Moscatos, made in different regions, are also famous since old time.

The regions are, roughly from Northwest to Southeast:

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